The Typhoon looks like a cool futuristic fighter with these new tanks

By Jesus Diaz on Sploid, shared by Casey Chan to Gizmodo

The Typhoon looks like a cool futuristic fighter with these new tanks

This picture—taken by airplane photographer Luigi Sani—shows a weird smooth hump on the central fuselage of an Eurofighter Typhoon. It’s one of its two new top Conformal Fuel Tanks, designed to further extend its range. They are now being tested by BAE Systems in wind tunnels.

Via: Gizmodo

    

HummingBoard, The Vastly More Powerful Raspi

By Brian Benchoff

Humming

The Raspberry Pi has been around for a while now, and while many boards that hope to take the Pi’s place at the top of the single board ARM Linux food chain, not one has yet succeeded. Finally, there may be a true contender to the throne. It’s called the HummingBoard, and packs a surprising amount of power and connectivity into the same size and shape as the venerable Raspberry Pi.

The HummingBoard uses a Freescale i.MX6 quad core processor running at 1GHz with a Vivante GC2000 GPU. There’s 2GB of RAM, microSD card slot, mSATA connector, Gigabit Ethernet, a BCM4329 WiFi and Bluetooth module, a real-time clock, and IR receiver. There’s also all the usual Raspberry Pi flair, with a 26 pin GPIO connector, CSI camera connector, DSI LCD connector, stereo out, as well as the usual HDMI and analog video.

The company behind the HummingBoard, SolidRun, hasn’t put a retail price on the board, nor have they set a launch date. You can, however, enter a contest to win a HummingBoard with the deadline this Friday. Winners will be announced in early May, so maybe the HummingBoard will be officially launched sometime around then.

It’s an amazing board with more than enough power to rival the extremely powerful BeagleBone Black, with the added bonus of being compatible with so many of those Raspberry Pi accessories we all love dearly.

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Via: Hack a Day

    

This busy street intersection with no traffic lights is just pure chaos

By Casey Chan on Sploid, shared by Casey Chan to Gizmodo

This busy street intersection with no traffic lights is just pure chaos

Anarchy. That’s what it’s like to drive on the streets of Ethiopia. There are no traffic lights, no painted lanes, no rules on who has the right of way, no fear of hitting the car in front of you, and basically no driver has any idea what the other driver is going to do until they do it. It’s chaos and probably inefficient—but, hey, it seems to work.

Via: Gizmodo

    

Massive ice melting moves entire bridge out of its place

By Jesus Diaz on Sploid, shared by Casey Chan to Gizmodo

Massive ice melting moves entire bridge out of its place

When it comes to the Northern countries, spring can be quite dangerous. Look at what happened when the frozen river started to melt in Sainte-Marie de Kent, New-Brunswick, Canada. They were lucky the bridge wasn’t completely obliterated—it just moved it about three or six feet.

Via: Gizmodo

    

Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Doctor Who

By James Hobson

doctor-who-logo

What’s a Sci-Fi contest without entries from the longest running sci-fi TV show, Doctor Who?

Sonic Screwdriver Door Lock

Sonic Screwdriver Lock

Ah yes, the iconic Sonic Screwdriver, able to get the Doctor out of almost any jam — with style.

Started this project over a year ago, [Daniel] figured a Sci-Fi contest was a good enough excuse to get around to finishing it.

Using a Raspberry Pi and a microphone, the lock unlocks when the python script detects a sound signature that matches previously recorded Sonic Screwdriver’s hums — meaning friends with novelty Sonic Screwdrivers can join in the fun too — if he lets them.

When the correct sound sample FFT is detected, the door is unlocked using a transistor that is connected to an electronic door strike. When completed you’ll be able to show off your true Whovian nature, and impress your friends!

Head Tracking Augmented Reality Police Box

Head Tracking TardisInspired by the augmented reality TARDIS that is actually bigger on the inside, [Mike] and his wife are working on creating one that doesn’t need a smart phone to enjoy.

Instead it uses head tracking and an LCD inside the door to create the illusion of a cavernous inside! A head tracking Tardis!

A webcam tracks your head’s position, which then changes the perspective of the interior of the TARDIS on the LCD — we’re getting giddy just thinking about it!

EXTERMINATE EXTERMINATE EXTERMINATE!!!

Dalek

While there isn’t too much information on this project, [th3c4rd] is planning on creating a Doctor Who Voice Modulator which will allow you to sound like your favorite villains with the press of a button!

Using a ring modulator for the effect, [th3c4rd] plans on making his own, since commercial ones will run you upwards of $200!

He’s still looking for a team-mate for the project so if you’re interested in helping out, get in touch!

Still haven’t entered the contest? Don’t worry — there’s still time for you to put an awesome Sci-Fi project together to win some crazy cool prizes!

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Via: Hack a Day

    

Gawker I Can’t Stop Staring at These Vape Trick Videos | Gizmodo What Your Poop Is Trying to Tell Yo

By Jessica Smith on io9, shared by Whitson Gordon to Lifehacker

Gawker I Can’t Stop Staring at These Vape Trick Videos | Gizmodo What Your Poop Is Trying to Tell You | Jezebel Women Think Men Sound Like Idiots When They Put on Flirty Voices | Kotaku The Game About Being A Jew That I Needed In High School | Kinja Popular Posts

Via: Lifehacker

    

2048: Embedded Edition

By Kristina Panos

Embedded touch version of 2048 tile game

How ’bout that 2048 game? Pretty addictive, huh? Almost as addictive as embedded systems are, at least if you’re [Andrew]. Armed (pun intended) with a Nucleo F4 and a Gameduino 2 shield, he decided to have a go at making an embedded version of the popular tile pusher web game.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Nucleo boards from STMicroelectronics, check out our post on the Nucleo family from a couple of months ago. The Gameduino 2 shield ships with a 4.3″ touchscreen driven by an FT800 GPU EVE. [Andrew] wrote his own driver for it and his blog post goes into great detail about its programming model and the SPI read, write, and command functions he wrote. Full code is available from [Andrew]‘s repo.

He started by generating a blank screen based on clues found in the Gameduino 2 source. Pretty soon he had rendered a rectangle and then a full 2048 board. A minor difference between [Andrew]‘s creation and the original is that his always creates new tiles as ’2′ while the web game cranks out the occasional ’4′.

We were unable to embed [Andrew]‘s gameplay videos, but you’ll find two on his blog.

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Via: Hack a Day

    

This Sci-Fi Helmet Could Give Fire Fighters Predator Thermal Vision

By Andrew Tarantola

This Sci-Fi Helmet Could Give Fire Fighters Predator Thermal Vision

When firefighters have to enter a burning building, much of their job still involves blindly feeling their way through dense plumes of toxic fumes in search of those trapped inside. However, a novel new helmet design could one day give firefighters the ability to see through the smoke and hear beyond the roar of the flames.

Via: Gizmodo